philip lelyveld The world of entertainment technology

20Apr/18Off

Buffalo Olmsted Parks Conservancy launches augmented reality app to mark 150th anniversary

The free Olmsted App offers a trivia game, a calendar of programming and events, and way-finding tools to help park-goers navigate the landmarks and amenities of the 850 acre Buffalo Olmsted Parks system.

Some of the points of interest also have augmented reality features, including the Quarry Garden area near the Parkside Lodge. "As you look at these bridges and wonder, why are there these bridges across grass? That is because 25 feet down there was a wonderful working rock quarry," Crockatt told those gathered there Friday morning for the Olmsteducation Week launch. "And over time it was covered in lush vegetation and had pools and it was called the Ledges, and it was a wonderful feature. And we're going to be able to bring that back through augmented reality."

The augmented reality features also include Olmsted characters educating park-goers about the areas around them.

See the full story here: http://www.wivb.com/news/local-news/buffalo-olmsted-parks-conservancy-launches-augmented-reality-app-to-mark-150th-anniversary/1131364299

20Apr/18Off

Ready Lawyer One: Virtual Reality Is Coming To Courtrooms

(15 sec video at link)

Lamber insists that first attorney will come along soon, promising, "As the costs associated with VR come down, along with some case precedents in some key jurisdictions, then you'll see the floodgates open."

08dc8d830d1be6d6a39a3da71a46ceb09f1fd6f8-2002-vr-clct-lab-trial-1See the full story here: https://www.law360.com/legalindustry/articles/1034403/ready-lawyer-one-virtual-reality-is-coming-to-courtrooms

20Apr/18Off

Virtual Reality Is Already Changing How We Work and Communicate

20180418193020-GettyImages-867422600Not that long ago, VR was consigned to video gaming technology, but it has quickly evolved into a tool for interpersonal connection.

The innovation can be mind-boggling. Just imagine lounging at home while socializing with your friends and business partners across the globe -- with the help of VR. This may sound unbelievable, but that is what VR has done for us.

1. The recording industry.

known in the psychoacoustic research community as head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) -- that happen naturally as sound wraps around the human head and is “shaped” by the outer and inner ears.

2. The medical industry.

surgery

3. The communication industry.

According to Jeremy Bailenson, founding director of Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab,  “VR takes all the gadgets away, it takes all the multitasking away and you actually feel like you’re with someone. We call this social presence — you see their emotions, you see their gestures and it feels just like you’re in the room with them.

4. The education sector.

VR is enhancing classroom learning as well. Teachers are able to use pre-programmed avatars, or digital representations of the user, to create a virtual world -- a computer-based environment through which users interact with each other.

Abstract topics are now represented in ways that make them look simple and appealing to the students.

5. Taking prototyping to another level.

See the full story here; https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/311735

 

 

19Apr/18Off

Haptics, the uncanny valley, and how to fix it.

See the full story here: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/if-virtual-reality-feels-almost-right-its-exactly-wrong/

19Apr/18Off

Tangible and Social: Virtual Reality at Tribeca Immersive

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Tribeca Immersive includes a Virtual Arcade of VR experiences (Apr. 20-28), along with a festival of films shot in 360 degrees. Both are running at the same time at TFF this month (Apr. 18-29), and will give even hardcore VR users an excuse to leave home and experience these site-specific installations at the festival’s headquarters. ...

Another VR experience that addresses social themes while still pushing the use of technology is “The Day the World Changed,” which takes place in a recreation of Hiroshima. Gabo Arora, co-creator of the project, said it is a “social interactive Virtual Reality documentary” which addresses nuclear weapons and allows users to experience life in Hiroshima the day of the atomic bombing at the end of World War II. Rather than being a passive, lonely experience, Arora pointed out that this is a rare example of a VR experience for multiple simultaneous users. “You’re doing this with three other people, so the whole concept of going through a documentary inside the documentary with other people who are also avatars gives it a whole new relationship of what a shared experience with history can be.”

Penrose Studios has made some of the longest VR experiences at previous Tribeca Immersive events, and this year they return with “Arden’s Wake: Tide’s Fall,” which has a running time of a whopping 30 minutes. Eugene Chung of Penrose said of it, “When making narrative VR experience it is crucial never to forget that you are creating for the viewers. We are always thinking about the consumer experience here at Penrose, and with a 30-minute experience, we are currently pushing the limits and the boundaries of VR stories.”

Among these lofty projects are some outright silly uses of VR, too. People who come to the Virtual Arcade will find the farcical “Vacation Simulator,” by Owlchemy Labs. ... “At Owlchemy, we’ve always sprinted in the opposite direction of the expected… We’re using this limitless, incredible technology to simulate a satirical vacation with a bunch of floating robots.”

See the full story here: http://www.downtownexpress.com/2018/04/18/tangible-and-social-virtual-reality-at-tribeca-immersive/

19Apr/18Off

With this tool, AI could identify new malware as readily as it recognizes cats

screen-shot-2018-04-18-at-10.28.23-amThis week, the cybersecurity firm Endgame released a large, open-source data set called EMBER (for “Endgame Malware Benchmark for Research”). EMBER is a collection of more than a million representations of benign and malicious Windows-portable executable files, a format where malware often hides. A team at the company also released AI software that can be trained on the data set. The idea is that if AI is to become a potent weapon in the fight against malware, it needs to know what to look for.

“It’s a game of whack-a-mole,”...

EMBER is meant to help automated cybersecurity programs keep up.

Instead of a collection of actual files, which could infect the computer of any researcher using them, EMBER contains a kind of avatar for each file, a digital representation that gives an algorithm an idea of the characteristics associated with benign or malicious files without exposing it to the genuine article.

See the full story here: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/610881/with-this-tool-ai-could-identify-malware-as-readily-as-it-recognizes-cats/?utm_source=newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_content=2018-04-19&utm_campaign=the_download

19Apr/18Off

Alphabet’s Eric Schmidt says Silicon Valley will need ‘AI principles’ before working with US military

503831584.jpg.0Testifying before the House Armed Services Committee on Tuesday, Schmidt said that AI would be useful for “defensive and perhaps offensive purposes” in warfare, and developing the technology would have to be done with the help of the private sector. When asked by Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY) how this would work considering the “reluctance” of tech companies to work with the Department of Defense, Schmidt suggested that firms will need to agree between themselves on acceptable norms.

“The industry is going to come to some set of agreements on AI principles — what is appropriate use, what is not — and my guess is that there will be some kind of consensus among key industry players on that,” said Schmidt.

Google has said that the technology it is helping to develop is for “non-offensive uses only” and is intended to flag images captured by surveillance drones for human inspection. However, there is no clear line between this use case and one that will result in fatalities. The Pentagon states that Project Maven’s computer vision tech is intended for deployment in war zones like Iraq and Syria.

see the full story here:

18Apr/18Off

AI creates ‘Flintstones’ cartoons from text descriptions

It can a long time to animate cartoons -- just ask the Rick and Morty team. But what if you could ask computers to do some of the lifting? They just might. Researchers have produced an AI system, Craft, that automatically produces The Flintstones scenes based on text descriptions. The team trained Craft to recognize elements from the classic cartoon by feeding it more than 25,000 three-second clips, each of which included descriptions of who was in the scene and what was happening. From there, the AI only needed a line or two referencing a scene to stitch together characters, backgrounds and props.

To call the current results crude would be an understatement. While the AI usually gets things right, it sometimes mangles the output. Also, The Flintstones is a relatively easy target.

See the full story here: https://www.engadget.com/2018/04/15/ai-creates-flintstones-cartoons/

18Apr/18Off

Apple Files a Patent for Augmented Reality to Enhance Driver Safety

l_5ad6401fa9c4fSoftware giant Apple has filed a patent dubbed "adaptive vehicle augmented reality (AR) display using stereographic imagery". The patent details an under-development technology which will utilize a pre-generated 3D model of the world to aid an augmented reality system which will deliver 3D content for its users.

See the full story here: http://www.futurecar.com/article-2164-1.html

18Apr/18Off

Snapchat Introduces 3 New Capabilities of Its Augmented Reality Lenses With ‘Shoppable AR’

snapchat-shoppable-CONTENT-2018The camera company is introducing three new features, dubbed “Shoppable AR,” to its augmented reality lenses: the “website,” which lets consumers tap a button and open up a webpage that can promote a product or sign-up page; a “video” option, allowing users to watch a trailer or how-to shorts; and “install,” which prompts users to install an app (or open it, if the user already has it on their phone).

With the website tool, Snapchat is trying to show both Wall Street and Madison Avenue that it can lead in social commerce. (Or at least until Facebook decides to rip it off.)

The camera company is introducing three new features, dubbed “Shoppable AR,” to its augmented reality lenses: the “website,” which lets consumers tap a button and open up a webpage that can promote a product or sign-up page; a “video” option, allowing users to watch a trailer or how-to shorts; and “install,” which prompts users to install an app (or open it, if the user already has it on their phone).

With the website tool, Snapchat is trying to show both Wall Street and Madison Avenue that it can lead in social commerce. (Or at least until Facebook decides to rip it off.)

See the full story here: http://www.adweek.com/digital/snapchat-introduces-3-new-capabilities-of-its-augmented-reality-lenses-with-shoppable-ar/